Four Quirky New York City Museums to Visit

Interior of the original Penn Station taken in 1935 by Berenice Abbott. Photo courtesy of the NYPL.

Interior of the original Penn Station taken in 1935 by Berenice Abbott. Photo courtesy of the NYPL.

 

There are more than 80 museums in our great city of New York and whether you just moved here or have been a resident for a while, you know the popular ones to visit—The Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Natural History and The Whitney Museum of American Art. The more adventurous types might head out to the Brooklyn Museum, MoMA PS-1 or the New Museum. But you don’t have to just visit these establishments: There are many museums that are quirky, unexpected and interesting. Here are our favorites:

 

 

Museum of Food and Drink (MOFAD)

 

The goal of MOFAD is to educate the public on the history, science, production, commerce and anthropology of food. Bla bla bla, here’s the thing, you get to eat exhibits if you visit this museum’s Williamsburg, Brooklyn gallery space.  Can you do that an art museum? Well, if you do, you’re strange and you’ll most likely get kicked out.

 

National Museum of Mathematics

 

Ditch the MoMA and head on over to MoMath. And if you’re one of those folks who says you’re just not good at math or that the discipline is useless, well then prepare to be surprised. You will be inspired and excited to take in the wonders of the exhibitions, many of which are hands on, and might even stop at the shop on your way out and buy yourself a math puzzle or book. Look at you liking math!

 

Tenement Museum

 

The five-story brick building that houses the tenement museum has been home to more than 7,000 people who immigrated and settled in the lower east side of Manhattan between 1863 and 1935. Learn about the challenges of immigration and its role in our nation’s past and future.

 

The New York Transit Museum

 

Visit this museum to see what makes our city, or rather us, go round. Peruse tunnels, subway cars, and even bridges at this downtown Brooklyn establishment housed in a 1936 subway station to learn about urban public transportation and much more. You’ll be sure to have a different appreciation for your subway ride home.