Cookbooks Everyone Should Have

 

The aroma, the act and the result of cooking give us a sense of home and one that’s lived in. But not everyone knows how to go about preparing a meal and many feel as though their repertoire is limited or repetitive and thus become bored with the act. In come cookbooks, which inspire and educate us on one of oldest and (hopefully) most fun of human activities. Here are six cookbooks we think everything should own:

 

The Joy of Cooking

You’ll be hard pressed to encounter a cook who doesn’t own this book, which has been in print and a staple for 85 years. It’s a standard, all-purpose cookbook that will have you referring back to it time and again.

 

The Essential New York Times Cookbook: Classic Recipes For a New Century

If like us, you read the New York Times’ cooking section—and occasionally make some of the food using the recipes—you’ll appreciate this book, which picks some of the best recipes from 150 years of the paper’s column.

 

How to Cook Everything

This Mark Bittman number with more than 2,000 recipes is another essential to have around the house. Use it to learn how to make new meals or improve on ones you already have in your repertoire.

 

Mastering the Art of French Cooking

With this book, Julia Child brought meals like boeuf bourguignon into American homes. This comprehensible and informative volume will help you master a typically difficult and sophisticated cuisine. 

 

Real Cajun: Rustic Home Cooking from Donald Link's Louisiana

If Cajun country eatin’ is your thing, then get this book and get cooking. From the amazing Cajun shrimp stew to the chicken and bacon hash, we promise you won’t be sorry having this volume around.

 

Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking

This cookbook by Marcella Hazan is the Italian counterpart to Julia Child’s book on French cooking. Use it to master a cuisine rightfully beloved by so many around the world.